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#1 Nov 06 2012 at 12:42 PM Rating: Excellent
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Parenting post here for you others out there with tiny minions.

Does anyone else have a picky eater in the household? Any hints or tips for getting them to eat things?

Our eldest is about 20 hours into a general hunger strike refusing to eat her dinner from last night. We're not really "go to bed without dinner" kinds of parents, but she's proven more than willing to do so on her own accord (i.e. she has had no problems going to bed without eating rather than eating dinner). This is the first time we're really pushing it though, giving her the same thing for breakfast the next day, making her stay at the table, etc.

Unfortunately my daughter has inherited a good deal of stubbornness for both myself and my wife. Smiley: rolleyes

She won't eat any meat (save McDonald's chicken nuggets) or any vegetables (V8-fusion has been our last resort...); we've tried several of both without luck. Preferring fruit, dairy, and the occasional starch (rice, bread, pasta mostly). She's in relatively good health at the moment, but we're trying to add some of that variety she should have into her diet. It's not that we want her to eat a certain food she hates or something, but there's whole food groups she avoids, and we just want her to eat something from that category. That's the part that worries us mostly.

Or do we just let it go already?

Bleh, life is sucky at the moment. Smiley: frown

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#2 Nov 06 2012 at 12:53 PM Rating: Decent
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Feed her Hot Pockets, preferably the ones that contains the food groups you want her to have. That or make pizzas with those toppings on them, most kids will go for pizza despite whats on it.
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#3 Nov 06 2012 at 1:05 PM Rating: Good
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Can't offer any help here, I don't think my parents ever had to go beyond "try it before you say you don't like it" to get me or my sisters or brother to eat stuff. Hang in there though, there's few things I appreciate more from the way I was raised than preferring a reasonably healthy and varied diet, makes it much easier not to get fat.
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#4 Nov 06 2012 at 1:14 PM Rating: Excellent
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Shaowstrike the Shady wrote:
That or make pizzas with those toppings on them, most kids will go for pizza despite whats on it.


I really like this idea, it didn't work for us though. We went as far as letting her choose the toppings and make it herself (two things she's likes doing), and it was a no go. Won't touch cheese pizza either, pasta without sauce only... Smiley: frown

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Can't offer any help here, I don't think my parents ever had to go beyond "try it before you say you don't like it" to get me or my sisters or brother to eat stuff. Hang in there though, there's few things I appreciate more from the way I was raised than preferring a reasonably healthy and varied diet, makes it much easier not to get fat.


Smiley: smile
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#5 Nov 06 2012 at 1:33 PM Rating: Excellent
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Duct tape, blender, funnel.

My work here is done.
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#6 Nov 06 2012 at 1:43 PM Rating: Good
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Give up on her and focus your energies on the other one.
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#7 Nov 06 2012 at 2:47 PM Rating: Excellent
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Avoiding whole food groups seems odd. Did you ask her if eating meat, or veggies, or whatever gives her a tummy ache? Or is it just that she thinks she doesn't like it?
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#8 Nov 06 2012 at 2:57 PM Rating: Excellent
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Belkira wrote:
Avoiding whole food groups seems odd. Did you ask her if eating meat, or veggies, or whatever gives her a tummy ache? Or is it just that she thinks she doesn't like it?

Also ask if there's something about textures that's causing her a problem. Depending on the fruits she'll eat it could also be as simple as her preferring soft textures because of some kind of dental problem she hasn't articulated. Perhaps even a loose tooth that feels funny when chewing harder foods.

If this doesn't reveal other problems, there are a couple ways to sneak some veggies into other foods that are mostly undetectable. Try cauliflower mashed into mashed potatoes or parsnips made into chips(there's a Good Eats episode about it). Since she's eating starches, perhaps try blending some quinoa into some rice. There's another Good Eats episode about making peas into a burger-like patty. Perhaps molding the same recipe into nuggets might inspire the child to eat it?
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#9 Nov 06 2012 at 3:06 PM Rating: Excellent
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I'll have to give the more specific questions a go, don't recall having asked them.

We have asked several times more general questions such as "why don't you want to eat your hot dog?" The response being something along the lines of "I don't want to" or "it's icky." Most of the foods she simply hasn't even tried though, or has simply brought them to her mouth, touched them to her tongue and made a face and said something like "ewwww!" before putting it down.

Getting her to even try something is half the battle.
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#10 Nov 06 2012 at 3:10 PM Rating: Good
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We just get them to try some of what we're eating and on occasion, they actually will. Then, when we find something they like, we add it to their "meal plan" as well.

My son now tries just about everything we eat and then we need to scramble to get him a plate of it or we're losing our meal to him. My daughter we haven't had nearly as much success with, but on occasion, she will try something new.
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#11 Nov 06 2012 at 3:13 PM Rating: Decent
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Americans force feeding their kids are at least part of the childhood obesity problem in America. If she eats fruit and dairy, she's getting her fiber and protein in. Strangely enough, vegetables are an acquired taste for some people, and you should re-introduce them once she's hit puberty and can appreciate a good roast brussel sprout.

In the meantime, she'll eat when she's hungry.

Just make sure she's taking a gummy multivitamin every day.
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#12 Nov 06 2012 at 3:18 PM Rating: Excellent
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catwho wrote:
Strangely enough, vegetables are an acquired taste for some people, and you should re-introduce them once she's hit puberty and can appreciate a good roast brussel sprout.
I disagree on the timing. Try every few months. My kids suddenly like veggies they always hated out of no where. They both eat broccoli cooked or raw which is not typical of a 6 and 5 yr old. 3 months ago, my son only would've eaten cooked and my daughter not at all.
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#13 Nov 06 2012 at 3:58 PM Rating: Excellent
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Shaowstrike the Shady wrote:
Duct tape, blender, funnel.


This.

On a more serious note though, I think that parents stress overly much about making sure their kids eat x, y, and z, how much they eat, etc. Kids go through strange periods. Frankly, I can't figure out how they don't starve anyway, given that they're bundles of energy, yet eat like three tiny bites of food at any given meal (mashing the rest around on the plate but not eating it). And those are the ones that don't have weird food issues. Somehow, magically, they don't starve, and they do grow up just fine.

I'll just second the idea of letting her eat what she wants (within reason) coupled with vitamins. Periodically attempt to introduce other foods along the way. What many of my friends do is put several different things in small portions on the plate and let them choose. They'll attempt to get them to eat some of everything, but as long as they eat "enough", it's ok. Over time, the kids tastes will change, or they'll feel like trying something different. You wont know when it's going to happen, but it will.
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#14 Nov 06 2012 at 7:32 PM Rating: Good
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My kids won't eat anything they don't want to eat. Don't compare. Just do... I barter fruits and veggies because that works.

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#15 Nov 07 2012 at 12:10 AM Rating: Excellent
Here is how I fed my kids:


Kid: "I don't like it!"
Me: "Leave the table."
Kid: "OK"


They didn't die.
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#16 Nov 07 2012 at 7:06 AM Rating: Decent
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My kids generally offed little resistance when we came across something they didn't like. I like to think the fact that we have no pop in the house and never, ever go to fast food places has helped to keep them open to new foods.
Ultimately hunger will break stubbornness.
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#17 Nov 07 2012 at 8:36 AM Rating: Good
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Currently my 11 month old son will attempt to eat anything he can pick up. He has to taste all the things.

My 7 year old stepdaughter isn't really picky either. She actually asks for greens and veggies as a snack, and I'm pretty sure her favorite food are fresh roma tomatoes. She is not above eating junk food, either.
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#18 Nov 07 2012 at 10:04 AM Rating: Good
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someproteinguy wrote:
I'll have to give the more specific questions a go, don't recall having asked them.

We have asked several times more general questions such as "why don't you want to eat your hot dog?" The response being something along the lines of "I don't want to" or "it's icky." Most of the foods she simply hasn't even tried though, or has simply brought them to her mouth, touched them to her tongue and made a face and said something like "ewwww!" before putting it down.

Getting her to even try something is half the battle.


Next time ask her if it's the way it tastes or the way it feels. My son gets really hung up on textures of food. I assume you've tried both raw and cooked vegetables?

I can appreciate the texture issue. I think raw tomatoes are terrible, but love all tomato sauces, tomato soup, sundried tomatoes :P
#19 Nov 07 2012 at 5:27 PM Rating: Good
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I wouldn't worry about it too much. Give her the stuff from that group that she'll eat to make sure she maintains a balanced diet and just wait for her tastes to change.

Taste gradually changes as you get older so it shouldn't take long for her to grow into liking some of the things she hates now. Keep serving it to her and encouraging her to try it, but make sure she eats something. I'm not sure how old your little girl is, but the most important thing is that she gets calories in her to fuel that supercharged engine I'm sure she has.
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#20 Nov 07 2012 at 6:52 PM Rating: Decent
I'm not a parent. So my example and thought are of mine...
I put some of the blame of me being obese on my parents. The reason? When I was a kid and said I didn't want to eat "it", I didn't get to leave the table until "it" was gone. Even if I liked other parts of the meal, and gladly would have rather have had more it (and maybe was gave more), all food on my plate had to be gone. "They" say not chewing your food for a decent amount of time leads to being fat. I 100% believe this. So as child I would power through all the crap I hated to eat more of the stuff I liked, in the end I over ate and by the age of 8 my parents were getting stuck with a child who was twice as big as everyone else at every age. I blame another part due to living out of town all my life. I was only physically active at school, once that was over it was a 40min bus ride home to due homework and write out "spelling words" hundreds of time for the rest of the night. If I was given a break I watched TV or played video games. As I got older and into high school I did try and play football, but sadly I injured my knee and gave up one it due to the pain I was always in. So I would go home and play video games.
Did they learn their lesson? I have to say yes, because both my younger brothers got away with not eating every thing and could say yes/no to foods. They grew up "normal" size and healthy.

Enough about me . . . more on help, maybe. My parents actually took in some foster family (they were my fail cousin's kids) for some time about a year ago, and they were omfgpicky when it came to food. If she is old enough to say "no", ask why she doesn't like it. "Because I don't" should not be allowed.

Lets use the hotdog. Is it JUST a hotdog and nothing else? Maybe try slitting it and adding a sliver of cheese to it? ketchup? mustard? Bread? (protein, dairy, fats, and grain if you need to see it that way). One kid would not eat meat w/o ketchup. Actually you could put ketchup ON anything and he would then eat it. It was kind of gross (green beans and ketchup... Pizza and ketchup...toast and ketchup). However he was only give so much, maybe 2 servings worth and that was it.

She likes chicken nuggets from McD's? Will see eat chicken nuggets that are home made? Like Tyson's? If no, is it because they are not from McD's? Have you presented store bought ones to her IN a McD's box/bag? This was also a trick my parents used, and I know others out there have.

I say 1st you need to figure out what she likes. Is she at the age where solid foods are the "new" thing? Maybe her food needs to be pureed? There is all the vitamin drinks out there if you re worried about that, maybe she likes one?

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Frankly, I can't figure out how they don't starve anyway, given that they're bundles of energy, yet eat like three tiny bites of food at any given meal (mashing the rest around on the plate but not eating it). And those are the ones that don't have weird food issues. Somehow, magically, they don't starve, and they do grow up just fine.


It is that primal part of us. When it was time to run for safety, the young could go go go.

Edited, Nov 7th 2012 6:53pm by Sandinmygum
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#21 Nov 07 2012 at 7:20 PM Rating: Good
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Another non-expert chiming in here, but a former picky eater.

For me, at least, I want to quickly destroy two common ideas parents have about their children and picky eating. You could not bully me to eat anything I did not want to. I'd starve or sit at the table until the next morning. It also wasn't a choice for me. If I ate mashed potatoes at the age of 8, I'd literally gag, choke, and then vomit. It was a mental reaction, but it wasn't a choice. I wasn't pretending.

What ended up helping me was experimenting enough until I found a stable diet. It's probably going to be easier to find a new vegetable she ends up liking than changing her mind about a vegetable she presently does not. Also realize that the same food prepared differently may make a huge difference. With meat, you might try not only a variety of meats, but try doing them with a sweet sauce, source, spicy, salty, try boiling, try frying, etc.
#22 Nov 08 2012 at 10:12 AM Rating: Excellent
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So anyway, the wife decided yesterday afternoon to bargain with her some more. We got her to eat a peanut butter sandwich, which is progress. (She's almost 4 btw, since it's come up).

We've at some point tried about every different type of food we can think of in the veggie and meat category. The "not from McDonalds" nuggets don't go down as well, she'll take a bit or two out of each one and that's it. Still it's something though. The only other thing we've had luck with in the meat dept. is some fish she caught herself. We've fried, baked, broiled, breaded, sauced, etc. various things, but no go on any of it.

As for veggies, we've about run the list there too. Peas, beans, lettuce, squash, many various Asian veggies I can't remember the names of, corn, carrots, spinach, onions, and probably a lot more. We've tried cooking, steaming, raw, with some kinds of sauce (for the ones it usually makes sense with), no go.

At this point we're continuing to just keep putting different things in front of her and encouraging her to try it. Being disappointed when she doesn't eat it, and excited when she does. Thing is I'm positive she's caught onto our game by now. I don't think either of us really wants to go down the "you have to eat it and you're not getting anything else until you do" route again, since it seems she can hold out way longer than we feel comfortable letting her go without food.

Kids...

Now where did this gray hair come from? Smiley: rolleyes
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#23 Nov 08 2012 at 12:32 PM Rating: Good
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someproteinguy wrote:
Parenting post here for you others out there with tiny minions.

Does anyone else have a picky eater in the household? Any hints or tips for getting them to eat things?

Our eldest is about 20 hours into a general hunger strike refusing to eat her dinner from last night. We're not really "go to bed without dinner" kinds of parents, but she's proven more than willing to do so on her own accord (i.e. she has had no problems going to bed without eating rather than eating dinner). This is the first time we're really pushing it though, giving her the same thing for breakfast the next day, making her stay at the table, etc.

Unfortunately my daughter has inherited a good deal of stubbornness for both myself and my wife. Smiley: rolleyes

She won't eat any meat (save McDonald's chicken nuggets) or any vegetables (V8-fusion has been our last resort...); we've tried several of both without luck. Preferring fruit, dairy, and the occasional starch (rice, bread, pasta mostly). She's in relatively good health at the moment, but we're trying to add some of that variety she should have into her diet. It's not that we want her to eat a certain food she hates or something, but there's whole food groups she avoids, and we just want her to eat something from that category. That's the part that worries us mostly.

Or do we just let it go already?

Bleh, life is sucky at the moment. Smiley: frown

If you keep giving her yucky mcnuggies, that's all she's going to want.

Tricks, deals and even downright lies are ok to get kids to eat good stuff: I added 'mama magic' (brown sugar) to cooked carrots. The kids had to eat the 'wish bubbles' in pizza or bread crust before their wish was valid. Shapes make a difference. Oranges were cut into 'smiles'. Add peas to mac and cheese. Raisins and pb on celery makes bumps on a log.

You can try bargains - eat 4 carrot sticks to get one mcnugget....that kind of stuff.

Much of the problem that kids have with meat is that it's tough, their teeth are still pretty soft. Soften meat by marinating with salt.

Good luck.

Edit - try soups for getting at those veggies - fun shaped crackers might help.




Edited, Nov 8th 2012 7:34pm by Elinda
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#24 Nov 08 2012 at 1:49 PM Rating: Excellent
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Here is how I fed my kids:


Kid: "I don't like it!"
Me: "Leave the table."
Kid: "OK"


They didn't die.


This. Now that my kids are in the last years of their childhood, we've let them set their own time table for eating as well. Now it's more a battle of getting them to clean up after themselves when they've made a meal.
#25 Nov 08 2012 at 3:28 PM Rating: Excellent
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We had success for the first time with cooked broccoli and cauliflower by doing it in a cheese sauce. Tried that?
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#26 Nov 08 2012 at 3:46 PM Rating: Excellent
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Bribing can SOMETIMES work with the kids, "Eat this and tomorrow you can get mcdonalds" would work with my daughter. Tricking them to eat something works too. My stepson used to not want anything but chicken, I got him to eat duck, turkey, and pork by saying it was chicken. He is still a picky eater but is better than he used to be. My daughter CAN be picky but I have got her to eat things like catfish, calamari and even poor little thumper in a stew. My stepson picks up his eating habits from my wife, she is a kinda picky eater, my daughter seems to be picking it up from me and I will eat damn near anything at least once. But I wouldn't worry too much, at 4 they will be stubborn about food one day and then a week later want to eat it.
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#27 Nov 09 2012 at 6:24 AM Rating: Default
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This thread is an eye opener for me. I know kids not eating vegetables, but I never heard of them not eating junk food as well.
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#28 Nov 09 2012 at 8:36 AM Rating: Good
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My spawn'll eat anything, but the trick is getting her to eat enough. She'll take a few bites of everything and then complain about being full.
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#29 Nov 09 2012 at 9:09 AM Rating: Excellent
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I haven't read through all this but we've always just said "If you hate this, we'll try to remember and not make it so often in the future but it's what's for dinner tonight". If they refuse to eat it, they're middle class kids in suburban America -- one missed meal ain't gonna kill them.

We do legitimately try to keep them in mind after that though. They're not in charge but they're entitled to have food preferences. I know there's stuff Flea doesn't like but I don't intentionally cook it and tell her to shut up and eat it because it's dinner; I try to give the kids the same credit (within reason).
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#30 Nov 09 2012 at 9:33 AM Rating: Good
For clarity's sake, my anecdote was food-by-food, not the whole meal.

If a kid didn't like a particular food, we just didn't put it on their plate. The flip side to that was that we had a bare minimum of what you'd call junk food in the house at any given time so if the kid wanted an alternative, it was still a healthy choice.

Having said all that, the kids would eat most anything as long as it wasn't too weird. The eldest daughter, for example, hated pickled herring. My son, on the other hand , enjoyed spooning up chili con queso by the bowl at age two, so...
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#31 Nov 09 2012 at 10:46 AM Rating: Excellent
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Uglysasquatch wrote:
We had success for the first time with cooked broccoli and cauliflower by doing it in a cheese sauce. Tried that?


Not the traditional cheese sauce kind of thing like my grandma used to make, no. We've mixed broccoli (and several other things) into her mac and cheese on occasion. Never actually had any success that way though. Smiley: frown

She seems to have an aversion to sauce in general, doesn't seem to like how it looks.
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#32 Nov 10 2012 at 10:22 AM Rating: Good
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If she's refusing to eat food she used to eat, it's just a phase. It could be a dental issue, or she's trying your limits. My younger sister went through it and my older sister's kids are going through it. They'll grow out of it, or they'll become picky for life and people will hate them for it. Not much you can do about it except offer her a varied diet and insist that she eats something before going to bed.

Being Scandinavian, we always had rye bread and cold cuts in the house. If we didn't like a dish, we were told that we could go make ourselves a "leverpostejsmad" (open liver pate sandwich). I don't recall ever doing that, though, because whatever was being served was better than a rye bread sandwich with liver pate. I like liver pate, but it's not very interesting when served on rye bread (traditional open sandwich here).

It's important that you don't bribe your kid with something she wants, like candy or junk food. That's the entire point of her charade, if it's not a dental issue. She wants the stuff she knows and loves, so she's refusing to eat anything else, hoping you give in and let her have the other stuff. If you tell her that she can have junk food tomorrow if she eats her carrots today, she'll realize that it's working and keep doing it.

Make her some spaghetti bolognese. You can put all kinds of vegetables in the sauce (I suggest ground carrots, but be careful with the onions) and she'll get her dose of meat as well. She liked pasta products, right? Add some ketchup to sweeten the dish.

You can also make some frikadeller (pan-fried dumplings). Seriously, kids love that stuff here.

Like I said earlier, it's important that you don't bribe her. Bribing is exactly what she wants. It would be like Paris and the vikings all over again. The vikings sailed down to Paris and held the city ransom. The Parisians, being French and all, surrendered and paid the vikings who then left, as promised. Next year, however, the vikings returned and demanded more...

Sorry, I'm in the middle of writing a lesson plan about viking travels and that comparison just popped up.
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#33 Nov 14 2012 at 7:46 PM Rating: Good
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The pediatrician said that the kids would eat when they were hungry. I love her and she was wrong. I assume my kids are not typical and they would go days without eating if they don't want what I make. I will not quantify days but it broke me... It makes me sad because I love to cook and my family does not appreciate my ability (and yes doubters, I am an AWESOME cook, my skills are wasted).
#34 Nov 15 2012 at 12:09 PM Rating: Good
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eiran wrote:
The pediatrician said that the kids would eat when they were hungry. I love her and she was wrong. I assume my kids are not typical and they would go days without eating if they don't want what I make. I will not quantify days but it broke me... It makes me sad because I love to cook and my family does not appreciate my ability (and yes doubters, I am an AWESOME cook, my skills are wasted).


They're eating somewhere. Don't worry about it. They eat when they're hungry. They really do. Their bodies won't let them not starve. I always just told my kids "If you don't like it, you can go make yourself a sandwich. Or go to your room." There are plenty of times when Charmaine or Steven or Anthony lived on PB&J sandwiches for a week because I went on a creative spree and the kids didn't want to see what I made with gizzards or pork belly.


#35 Nov 15 2012 at 1:50 PM Rating: Excellent
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HI. My name is Lori and I am a picky eater.

If we are THAT hungry, we WILL find something to eat. Still to this day I will not eat what I do not like. And what makes that worse is my allergies totally screwed me, most of what I like, I cannot eat. It's an endless cycle and it's my own fault. The pickiness and only eating certain foods most of my life has contributed to my allergies.

Here is my suggestion: Offer them choices, try to make them healthy, but if you are at your wits end, just give them McDonald's or something once in a while. Things that work around here for example, you can't have soda unless you eat your dinner. We have one that hardly ever eats, she's 13 and weighs 70 pounds, doctor said she is fine. Another one won't eat sauces of any kind, no condiments, so all her food has to be plain and boring. We do the, "If you don't like what is for dinner, go make a sandwich" here also. We have also discovered it's easier to get your kids to try something new when it's someone else offering instead of us parents. If one of K's friends is eating sushi, I bet she'd drop what she was eating to try it. That would never happen here. All three girls would rather "die" than try something new...

Forgot to add:

I am pretty sure that my aunt's determination to get me to eat what was on my plate or sit there until it was eaten, and her insistence that I eat everything on my plate contributed to my stubbornness and my palate never maturing. I had no problem sitting at the table for days...

Edited, Nov 15th 2012 1:52pm by Darqflame
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#36 Nov 15 2012 at 4:01 PM Rating: Decent
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Growing up in a family with 5 kids and not a lot of money, neither myself nor my siblings are picky eaters. The closest is one of my sisters doesn't like onions, but that really developed later during her first pregnancy. Well, that and my oldest sister, whose picky eating is random, changes, and we're all pretty sure is just about getting people to pay attention to her. As kids though, if you didn't want to finish what was put on your plate, someone else would gladly finish it for you. Said lesson was learned pretty quickly and not often repeated. If you refused to eat dinner, you went to bed hungry. It was that simple.
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#37 Nov 15 2012 at 4:46 PM Rating: Good
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Darq, while it's not an officially acknowledged mental disorder yet, selective eating disorder (SED) is a... thing.

The interesting part is the treatment part: Exposure therapy and cognitive behavioral therapy apparently works. Could be worth a try if it's bothering you.
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#38 Nov 15 2012 at 4:57 PM Rating: Excellent
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Mazra wrote:
Darq, while it's not an officially acknowledged mental disorder yet, selective eating disorder (SED) is a... thing.

The interesting part is the treatment part: Exposure therapy and cognitive behavioral therapy apparently works. Could be worth a try if it's bothering you.


That's interesting. I am, in fact, a supertaster!

I cannot stand mushrooms in any form, they are slimy and just eww! However, if you hide them in things like spaghetti, I will eat them. Peas are the same, put them in ramen, chinese food or stew and I will eat them. I have learned to like raw spinach and broccoli. I have adjusted to eat things like chili and tacos, but I cannot eat table pepper, it burns. Yes, I am weird. Smiley: sly
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#39 Nov 15 2012 at 4:57 PM Rating: Decent
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Mazra wrote:
Darq, while it's not an officially acknowledged mental disorder yet, selective eating disorder (SED) is a... thing.

The interesting part is the treatment part: Exposure therapy and cognitive behavioral therapy apparently works. Could be worth a try if it's bothering you.


Maybe I'm a picky reader? I notice things like the fact that they mention "food neophobia", with just the second word linked and pointing to the neophobia page. But upon going to that page, you find that there is a whole separate page for food neophobia. Yeah. Little things like that amuse me.
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#40 Nov 15 2012 at 6:28 PM Rating: Good
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Mistress Darqflame wrote:
I cannot stand mushrooms in any form, they are slimy and just eww!
Smiley: oyvey
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#41 Nov 15 2012 at 6:36 PM Rating: Good
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Mistress Darqflame wrote:
I cannot stand mushrooms in any form, they are slimy and just eww! However, if you hide them in things like spaghetti, I will eat them. Peas are the same, put them in ramen, chinese food or stew and I will eat them. I have learned to like raw spinach and broccoli. I have adjusted to eat things like chili and tacos, but I cannot eat table pepper, it burns. Yes, I am weird. Smiley: sly


Not a fan of mushrooms either, regardless of how they're prepared. It's not that I won't eat them, I just don't get any pleasure out of doing it. Same with spinach and raw broccoli/cauliflower. Peas are delicious, though. We get peas to almost anything involving rice or chicken. Peas + chicken gravy = wintastic. Has to be the frozen kind, by the way. Fresh peas taste very differently from the frozen kind you thaw in hot water.

Love pepper. Not a fan of chili and all that exotic stuff, but regular old black pepper is awesome. When I go out eating with my parents, my dad and I will order each our pepper steak and sweat our way through the evening, enjoying the natural thirst that comes with it, allowing us to gulp down pint after pint of refrigerated pilsner.

I'm hungry and thirsty now. Smiley: frown

Edit: "Eat out", Maz? Seriously?

Edited, Nov 16th 2012 1:39am by Mazra
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#42 Nov 15 2012 at 11:53 PM Rating: Good
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Mazra wrote:
Peas are delicious, though. We get peas to almost anything involving rice or chicken. Peas + chicken gravy = wintastic. Has to be the frozen kind, by the way. Fresh peas taste very differently from the frozen kind you thaw in hot water.

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#43 Nov 16 2012 at 9:27 AM Rating: Good
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Inhaling food is generally a bad idea.
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#44 Nov 16 2012 at 3:20 PM Rating: Decent
My brother and I were both picky eaters as children. My parents got around this by being a bit creative. We didn't like spaghetti sauce, so when my mom would make spaghetti, she'd set some aside from us and basically use tomato soup and melted cheese(or cheez whiz) to make it comparable to canned Heinz Pasta or Chef Boyardee. She'd trick us into eating spaghetti sauce sometimes by making a sauce for mac & cheese(I won't say Kraft Dinner for the sake of you non-Canadians), that was more or less the same as her spaghetti sauce(minus a couple of the veggie ingredients, making it a tomato sauce with onions and cut up hot dog), but made with bits of hot dog, and hence appealing to us. As far as fruits or veggies went, she cooked a lot with peas and corn, and bought a lot of pears and bananas(and broccoli. We did the whole, not eating much meat outside of McDonalds Chicken McNuggets too, problem was solved by my mom either buying breaded chicken nuggets from the store, or, in one case, taking a shot at making them from scratch. You just gotta get creative, call things by names that don't indicate that the things they don't like are in it, or make non-processed versions of processed foods. Maybe get her into cooking, it might help. I might have some recipes if you'd like("might". I'm preparing to move next month, so I may have boxed them all up already, and I'm not going to be going through boxes until the move is done), I can take a look, just send me a PM.

It may be necessary though, to just let it go, and just wait for her tastes to change, making sure she gets all the nutrients and vitamins she needs from other sources.

These days, I find I like almost everything. There are so many different flavours, textures, and ways of making things. I stopped being picky as soon as I started cooking as a career choice. Going to school for it only broadened my tastes, and you can't really be picky at all after you've eaten something that's very much still alive and found it to be delicious. You can't name any dish on the planet that I wouldn't eat at this point.

Edited, Nov 16th 2012 4:22pm by Driftwood
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#45 Nov 16 2012 at 3:41 PM Rating: Decent
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someproteinguy wrote:
She won't eat any meat (save McDonald's chicken nuggets)...


someproteinguy wrote:
The "not from McDonalds" nuggets don't go down as well, she'll take a bit or two out of each one and that's it.


Tyrrant wrote:
Bribing can SOMETIMES work with the kids, "Eat this and tomorrow you can get mcdonalds" would work with my daughter.


Mistress Darqflame wrote:
Offer them choices, try to make them healthy, but if you are at your wits end, just give them McDonald's or something once in a while.


Monsieur Driftwood wrote:
We did the whole, not eating much meat outside of McDonalds Chicken McNuggets too...



I think I've found the problem.
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#46 Nov 16 2012 at 3:43 PM Rating: Decent
To be fair, I said McDonalds, but it basically applied to all fast food chicken things. Also, to be more fair, despite liking them more, we rarely got the Chicken McNuggets. Fast food was a bit of a rarity in our home due to the moneys.
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#47 Nov 16 2012 at 6:04 PM Rating: Good
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Monsieur Driftwood wrote:
You can't name any dish on the planet that I wouldn't eat at this point.


Oh, really?
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#48 Nov 16 2012 at 9:44 PM Rating: Decent
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Sounds like me as a child honestly. I was a stubborn pain in the ass with a lot of things. My only guess is to push the "you haven't even tried it." bit. It's kind of a lose-lose situation. If given the choice I wasn't going to try it, but if I was ordered/forced to eat something I'd be so stubborn that even if I ended up not disliking the taste or texture I wouldn't admit it and would stand firm that I didn't like it.

I eventually grew out of my food-stubbornness, but that took years.

Edited, Nov 16th 2012 10:48pm by Deadgye
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#49 Nov 17 2012 at 1:40 AM Rating: Good
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Mazra wrote:
Monsieur Driftwood wrote:
You can't name any dish on the planet that I wouldn't eat at this point.


Oh, really?
I still don't understand why Casu Marzu isn't the number one item on that list.
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#50 Nov 17 2012 at 2:19 AM Rating: Excellent
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We had to have it out with my youngest a couple years ago. He sat there until he ate it, or until bedtime. Eventually we won, and now with an application of good manners they can ask to apply the three bites rule: you can just have three reasonable sized bites of whatever. Caveat: That's all you get. You can't have something different, we're not making you a special dinner.

Once manners have been established I'll meet them halfway. For example, Junior doesn't like seafood, so when I made seafood Alfredo I made his with a hot dog.

I missed it in scrollback, how old is the protester?
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#51 Nov 17 2012 at 7:21 AM Rating: Decent
Mazra wrote:
Monsieur Driftwood wrote:
You can't name any dish on the planet that I wouldn't eat at this point.


Oh, really?


I've read that article. I haven't tried them, so, if I had the option, I would try each and every one of those dishes before making a judgement. So what if it's made of gross sounding things? Could be delicious. However, I will admit that I'm wary of that Casu Marzu, not because of the larvae, I've eaten larvae based dishes, it's the weeping cheese that bothers me a bit.

Edited, Nov 17th 2012 8:28am by Driftwood
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